Interviewed for Art Saves Lives International magazine

Earlier this year I submitted my work to Art Saves Lives International, as part of project aimed to develop both an social-wide understanding of mental illness, and how art can be a great tool or coming to terms/dealing (even somewhat overcoming) certain materialisations of mental illness.

As my blog makes explicit. I do not shy away from talking about my psychological difficulties in regards to the world we are all forced to adapt (or die) to. For this reason I was more than happy to be involved in ASLI’s project. For me mental health awareness-raising is a totally political act. Yet, from an art-making point of view, if simply encouraging somebody to get into a creativity-habit helps them function in this human-disfunctioning social system, then I’m more than happy to be involved.

ASLI MAGAZINE - creating change

Artist John Ledger Artist John Ledger

John Ledger, 31 from Yorkshire, United Kingdom is an artist who specialises in fine art and drawing. With a self professed existentialist nature, John continues to search for what he defines as a “breathing space” in order to find the answer to one of life’s big questions “who am I” and says “I experience this world we’re in as one that demands a competitive and unending assertion of oneself, with the inevitably of daily crises of identity”. However John uses his art to address this demand from our world and asserts himself with “f**k you, this is me” which we at ASLI are like minded in this way, which is just one reason Johan’s work stood out to us amongst the thousands of entries we received.

Having always drawn throughout childhood, to channel fleeting obsessions and ideas which then transformed into endless doodles, this behaviour was self censored during high-school so as to not stand…

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About John Ledger

A visual Artist, eternal meanderer and obsessive self-reflector by nature, who can’t help but try to interpret everything from within the tide of society. His works predominantly take the form of large scale ballpoint pen landscape drawings and map-making as social/psychological note-making. They are slowly-accumulating responses to crises inflicted upon the self in the perplexing, fearful, empty, and often personality-erasing human world.

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